Review of The Pride

PrideBookCoverSnagitThe Pride by Patricia Morse

Purchase from Amazon: The Pride

Book Description

Six brave Americans heard their calling after the attacks of September 11, 2001. Evie, Lexie, and the Four Fellas courageously volunteered to become super-human hybrid warriors, to aid the United States against her war on terror. Little did they know, sometimes the terror comes from within.  The Pride will take you on a cross country journey full of action, suspense, and even a little romance, as Evie, Lexie, and their brood take on an enemy that none of them could have seen coming.

Review

Let me start this review by stating that I chose not to finish this book; therefore, my review is premature and should not necessarily deter others from giving this book a chance.

I downloaded this book, excited about the premise. Following the September 11th terrorist attacks, the military takes a select group of soldiers from various branches of the military and each undergoes a transformation that combines lion and human DNA to create “super soldiers”  known as The Pride. Two of the central characters, Lexie and Evie, are females, and the point of view switches between them (as far as I read).  In many of the military suspense novels I have read, the protogonists are male, so I was looking forward to the story told from a female perspective.

For me, a good story will grab the reader’s attention and pull them into the fictitious world created. The book begins with Lexie describing how she feels upon waking from her transformation and providing background information to set up the plot. I found the exposition behind the story’s permise to be lacking.  Why choose to use lion DNA?  How did scientists and doctors know this would work?  What are the benefits, the risks for everyone involved?  I just learn that it happened. Lexie says, “I stared at myself in the mirror, hardly recognizing the face staring back at me. My hair was luminescent and golden, my skin flawless and glowing, and my eyes the color of emeralds. I guess the combination of lion and human DNA makes for a nice package.”

I use that quote to lead me into the second issue I have with book, the portrayal of Lexie.  She is self-absorbed about her physical appearance and constantly stares at herself in the mirror. As a woman, I understand the desire to feel attractive, and there is nothing wrong with being feminine. However, the way she thinks just doesn’t mesh with the idea of a warrior.  For example, on the group’s first mission, they are doing reconnaissance, and Lexie complains about her situation: “I hated reconnaissance missions with a passion. I’m more the maini, pedi, shoe shopping type of a gal.”  Several paragraphs later, she goes on to say, “Anything was better than laying in pine needles and mud. I’d never get the dirt out of my hair.  I didn’t know why we were here, and I didn’t care….Besides recon isn’t my role in the pride. I seduce the prey and the others flock in for the kill.”  Okaaayy, I’m left wondering how in the world did she make it as a marine with that mindset?

Lexie does make a good point, though…she and I both are unclear about the purpose of the mission and why they are there. The pride members  don’t seem to have a concrete plan for completing this mission. Again, I may be premature in saying this because I didn’t read far enough, but as a reader I wanted more information and details by this point.

My final issue with the story that stopped my reading progression is that the author told me what was going on rather than showing me. In an online article called “Showing Versus Telling,” Pamela Rice Hahn explains the difference between the two:  “Showing in a story merely means that you’re allowing the reader to participate in the events rather than just rattling off what happened. When the reader participates, it creates involvement-he or she can see the events unfolding, and then is left wondering what is going to happen next.”  Hahn then provides a great example of narrative that tells and is then revised to show. I’ll include the link for the article at the end.

I am not one to give up on books very easily, and I try to read the entire book before forming an opinion. However, as I get older, I value my time more, and there are so many other books out there waiting to be experienced.

Other readers’ expectations may differ from mine, and they may find the book enjoyable and satisfying. The plot certainly provides a creative angle on fighting the war on terrorism, so try it to see if it appeals to you.

Link to article

Showing Versus Telling

Rating

thunder-icon 40

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